Mass Theme

September 15th ✙ 24th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Readings for September 15th, 2019

        TO SIN IS TO STRAY from God. Which of us can say that we have never strayed from God? But Jesus, the Good Shepherd, comes looking for us, and is overjoyed when he finds us. Let us pause for a moment to call to mind our need to be forgiven the things that separate us from God.
        Lord Jesus, you have mercy on us, and in your compassion blot out our offenses. Lord, have mercy.
        You wash us more and more from our guilt and cleanse us from our sins. Christ, have mercy.
        You create a pure heart for us and you put a steadfast spirit within us. Lord, have mercy

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MONDAY, September 16: ✟ Tony and Elinore Ackerman
TUESDAY September 17: Intentions of Oralee Floria
WEDNESDAY September 18:✟ Dete Bambino
FRIDAY August 20 :✟ Gerald & Marge Butler
Call the office at (530)926-4477 if you have Mass Intentions

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September 14th, Saturday
Eucharist:Bill Navarre
Cups:Kris Acord & Natalie Codianne
Lectors: Mary Bates & Oralee Floria
Altar Servers: Elise & Linnea Dolf
Cross Bearer: Nathan Dolf
Ushers:Frank Melo & Frank Correa
2nd Collection:****

September 15th, Sunday
Eucharist:Cindy Hubbard
Cups:Teresa Hickey & Alvin Garcia
Lectors:Sandy Meneni & Paul Chapman
Altar Servers:Daniel Forslund & Adam Aguirre
Cross Bearer: Volunteer
Ushers: Mike Rodriguez & Bruno Zamperin
2nd Collection:****

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Reflections

The Gilded Calf

      When Moses led the Hebrews to Mount Sinai, he explained that God wanted to sign a blood pact or covenant with them. He then climbed the mountain to receive the terms–the 10 commandments. A month passed with no word from the prophet. The Hebrews grew restless and eventually abandoned their God.
       They demanded that Moses' brother Aaron create a statue of Hathor, the Egyptian goddess of fertility. She was often pictured as a calf.
       The key scene in this story is that of Moses pleading to God for the forgiveness of the people. The Psalms picture him as standing in a breach between two rocks–sort of straddling both heaven and earth.

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Reflections

Prayer for the Lost Lambs

Lord Jesus, we pray for all the sheep that are lost,
but our hearts go out especially to the lost lambs.
Have mercy on the human wolves who steal, exploit, and sometimes kill the lambs of the Father’s flock;
Help them to see the horror of what they are doing.
Comfort the grieving parents who in many cases don’t even have the consolation of a burial service.
In your merciful love grant that those lambs, though lost here, may be found hereafter.
Watch over those who are still straying here below.
Guide them along paths that are safe.
Send shepherds to look for them.
And open the eyes of society so that we may cease to regard property as more important than people.
Amen

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Miscellaneous

Why Do Cathothics Do That?

What is "stewardship"?

Stewardship is a way of life and is best understood within the context of conversion and evangelization. A steward is defined as a disciple of Jesus who “Receives God’s gifts gratefully, cultivates them responsibly, shares them lovingly in justicewith others and returns them with increase to the Lord.”
The disciple is motivated to share his/her time, talent, treasure, and assets with the Church and other worthy causes from a deep sense of gratitude and in a planned, proportionate and sacrificial manner.
Jesus’ disciples and Christian stewards recognize God as the origin of life, giver of freedom, and source of all things. We are grateful for the gifts we have received and are eager to use them to show our love for God and for one another. We look to the life and teaching of Jesus for guidance in living as Christian Stewards.
-U.S. Bishops’ Pastoral Letter, Stewardship
As each one has received a gift, use it to serve one another as good stewards of God’s varied grace. (1 Peter 4:10)

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Eating With Sinners

       Today's Gospel begins with a stinging criticism of Jesus: he eats with sinners! Tax collectors were little more than legalized thieves in 1st century Palestine. Worse yet, they were traitors who collaborated with the occupying government.
       "Good people" didn't associate with them, much less break bread with the unsavory lot. They were literally excommuni cated from "polite" society.
      Jesus counters this self-righteousness with three parables. They illustrate the joy brought by conversion.

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