Mass Theme

July 14th ✙ 15th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Readings for July 14th, 2019

       TODAY WE WILL HEAR again the great parable of the Good Samaritan. In this parable Jesus tells us that God wants us to care for one another. The priest and the Levite stand condemned for a sin, not of commission but of omission -they refused to help the man who got beaten up. Sins of omission may be our worst sins, yet we don't always think of them as sins.
        Jesus is the Good Samaritan. He binds up our wounds.
        Lord Jesus, you have compassion for us in our sorrows and sufferings. Lord, have mercy.
        You heal in us the wounds of sin and division. Christ, have mercy.
        You bring us to the inn of eternal life. Lord, have mercy.

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MONDAY, July 15: ✟ Robert Edward Olson
TUESDAY July 16: ✟ Linda Miller
WEDNESDAY July 17: ✟ Mary Pellegrino
FRIDAY July 19 : Healing of Annie Komlofsky

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Why Do Cathothics Do That?

Gesture during the Confiteor?
        Prayers involve the mind, heart, voice and body. When our bodies also participate we tend to pray with greater attention. For this reason,during the Confiteor we strike our breasts at the words “through my own fault.” Striking one’s breast is an ancient symbol of repentance and sorrow.
       In the Confiteor we recognize and profess sorrow for our sins by word and deed. This helps prepare us for a more holy participation in the sacred Eucharistic celebration that itself can affect reparation for sins.

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Reflections

The Act of Benevolence

       Benevolence is a fancy word that means something simple: good intentions toward living beings, including oneself. This goodwill is present in warmth, friendliness, compassion, ordinary decency, fair play, kindness, altruism, generosity, and love.
        The benevolent heart leans toward others; it is not neutral or indifferent. Benevolence is the opposite of ill will, coldness, prejudice, cruelty, and aggression. The bottomline, benevolence is good for the entire world!

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Reflections

Beatitudes for Carers

The good Samaritan was someone who cared.
Blessed are those who care: they will let people know they are loved.
Blessed are those who are gentle: they will help people to grow as the sun helps the buds to unfold.
Blessed are those who listen: they will lighten many a burden.
Blessed are those who know how to let go:
They will have the joy of seeing people find
themselves.
Blessed are those who, when nothing can be done or said,
do not walk away, but remain to provide a comforting and supportive presence: they will help the sufferer to bear the unbearable.
Blessed are those who recognise their own need to receive:
They will be able to give all the better.
And blessed are those who give without hope of return:
They will give people an experience of God.

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The Image of God

       Try to imagine meeting an alien being who is pure energy; who has no physical form; who is pure intellect–pure benevolence; and who is immortal. How would you be able to relate to such a being? How would you communicate? How would you be able to love such a being? This is not science fiction. It is a description of the problems we have in dealing with God.
       Of course, God is not an alien. God is an infinitely loving creator. But we are so unlike God that we might as well be aliens ourselves. God solved the problem by appearing on earth in the person of Jesus. We can relate to God because we can relate to God's human form.
       Paul tells us that Jesus is the "image of the invisible God." In other words, the qualities of love and mercy and humility that we see in Christ are a perfect reflection of the same qualities in God. Jesus is God made visible.

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This Week's Gospel

       Who is my neighbor? Jesus answers this question with a parable about a person who should be an enemy but who demonstrates compassion. Samaritans were foreigners who had moved into Israel several centuries before Jesus. They were allies of the Assyrians who had conquered the country. They commandeered not only the land of the Israelites but even many of their religious institutions. The bitterness between the two peoples only intensified in the following centuries.
        Both the Jewish priest and the Levite (a temple aide) avoid the apparently dead victim. They would become ritually impure by touching a corpse. This would prevent them from doing their religious duties. The hated Samaritan has no such obligations and shows true love for the injured stranger. There are still a small number of Samaritans left in Palestine.

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